“I would really like to fight it, but it just comes down to finances,” he said, estimating that he could be forced to pay up to $25,000 in damages, plus lawyer fees, if he fights the suit and loses. In the meantime, several pages of the hotel’s website have been replaced with plain type because “no access is equal access for everyone, per the ADA requirements,” the site notes.

Why was Amazon sued to begin with? Believe it or not, it was the Kindle converter for documents. Amazon has developed its own converter (MobiPocket) to digitize all the documents, books, and magazines that are shown on Kindle. But the problem is that Amazon’s converter was making it difficult for people with disabilities to access any items other than super basic documents.

Barden v. The City of Sacramento, filed in March 1999, claimed that the City of Sacramento failed to comply with the ADA when, while making public street improvements, it did not bring its sidewalks into compliance with the ADA. Certain issues were resolved in Federal Court. One issue, whether sidewalks were covered by the ADA, was appealed to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled that sidewalks were a "program" under ADA and must be made accessible to persons with disabilities. The ruling was later appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which refused to hear the case, letting stand the ruling of the 9th Circuit Court.[62][63]


Rite Aid to ensure that all pages of their riteaid.com website substantially complied with Level AA of WCAG 1.0 accessibility standards by December 31, 2007, and that all pages of riteaidhealthsolutions.com, which can be accessed via a link on riteaid.com, also comply with Conformance Level AA of WCAG 1.0 by February 29, 2008. This was before WCAG 1.0 was superseded by version 2.0, therefore in the case when W3C introduces WCAG 2.0 Rite Aid had the opportunity to choose between version 1.0 and 2.0 compliance.
We often see projects of gas station replacing old fuel dispensers with access compliance fuel dispensers (reach range, operable parts, point-of-sale). According to Section 11B-202.4, Exception 10, these projects would be required to comply with accessibility for primary accessible path to inside the convenient store at the gas station, public restrooms, drinking fountains, public telephones, and signs (with 20-percent limit of adjusted construction cost). Is my understanding correct regarding the replacement of old/addition of new fuel dispensers?
No formal government standards exist for private businesses to follow to ensure their websites comply with the ADA, although a consortium of web innovators has created guidelines, known as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, to make websites more accessible to disabled people. Government websites already follow those guidelines, but private business websites, which are typically loaded with images and video, tend to be more difficult to overhaul to meet the guidelines, experts say.
In the new construction of a new facility, all accessible rooms and spaces are required to be connected by an accessible route and all toilet facilities, drinking fountains, public telephones and signs are subject to accessibility requirements. These fundamental requirements provide accessibility in excess of that required for alterations to existing facilities so the regulations associated with path of travel requirements are not applicable to new facilities.

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The California Green Code appears to require service panels, sub-panels, and raceway of sufficient capacity to accommodate 40 amp circuits rather than mandating one 40 amp circuit for each EVCS in residential and nonresidential locations. For additional information you may contact the Department of Housing and Community Development for infrastructure requirements at residential locations or the Building Standards Commission for infrastructure requirements at nonresidential locations
People with disabilities should be able to easily access the Internet. (You can find a video about how screen readers work here.) But to accomplish this, the DOJ should have issued regulations. It issued regulations for State and local governments. It issued regulations for Federal agencies. Why not issue regulations that would apply to private business? As a point of reference, in October 2016, the European Parliament approved the directive 2016/2102 that requires websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies to conform with WCAG 2.0 Level AA. New websites must comply from 23 September 2019 on, old websites from September 23, 2020 on and mobile applications from June 23, 2021 on. These regulations provided direction and time for business to become compliant.
Many properties do NOT have enough electricity available to support significant charging installations, so for now, utilities and others are doing “make ready” spaces (upgrading the supporting infrastructure in a parking space for future use without adding the actual charger). How would make ready spaces comply with the ADA standards? Additionally, consider a site with 10 make ready spaces. Would the standards apply differently if that site has no chargers presently installed versus having one active charger installed?

All work is required to comply with the applicable codes, standards and ordinances. Parking ordinances are typically adopted within each city and county in California. Consistent with the state’s policies on electric vehicles, DSA encourages city and county officials to recognize the necessary impact of EVCS and adopt responsive ordinances consistent with the local needs.
Defendant: HRB Digital LLC, one of the largest tax return preparers in the United States that offers a wide range of services online via website and mobile apps. Services include professional and do-it-yourself tax preparation, instructional videos, office location information, interactive live video conference and chat with tax pros, online and in-store services and electronic tax-return filing.
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